Mr. Herbert took his audience down this dark path, achieving impressive high notes and false hope in “Die Post” as a winter sun winked and glimmered overhead.
— Winterize/Winterreise at The Brooklyn Botanic Garden, Brooklyn, New York
Paul J. Pelkonen, Superconductor, December 2016
Photo by Jessica Singer

Photo by Jessica Singer

...Mr. Herbert’s sonorous voice made for pretty listening...
— Winterize/Winterreise at The Brooklyn Botanic Garden, Brooklyn, New York
Teddy Wayne, The New York Times, December 2016
...bass Christopher Dylan Herbert leaped into tenor territory for a wonderfully unhinged ‘Thou shalt break them.’
— Soloist with Choir and Baroque Orchestra of Trinity Wall Street
Handel's Messiah
Joshua Kosman, San Francisco Chronicle, December 2016
But as the second half closed in on Don Quixote’s death, New York Polyphony baritone Christopher Dylan Herbert sang an anonymous romance with elegant mastery.
— Soloist with Piffaro: The Musical World of Don Quixote, Philadelphia
David Patrick Stearns, Philadelphia Inquirer, October 2016
All five men in her life were played by baritone Christopher Herbert. He showed a kaleidoscope of different vocal colors as he switched between five different roles... (The Whole Truth)
...Although he was reduced to playing only one character in this show, Mr. Herbert proved his strength as a dramatic baritone. He was at turns eerily calm and raving as the murderous Montresor. (The Cask of Amontillado)
— The Man in The Whole Truth and Montresor in The Cask of Amontillado with American Modern Ensemble, Dixon Place
Paul Pelkonen, Superconductor, January 2016
Photo by Brandon Blinderman

Photo by Brandon Blinderman

Notable among the vocal soloists were the soprano Sarah Brailey, the alto Luthien Brackett and the basses Christopher Herbert, Jonathan Woody and Dashon Burton.
— Soloist in J.S. Bach Cantata BWV 215 at Trinity Wall Street
James R. Oestreich, The New York Times, January 2016
Mr. Herbert is a very special artist, bringing to the work some rather intense scholarship and a deep understanding of the text. He has a reserved stage presence, economic of gesture but generous with vocal shadings. His German is excellent with no consonant slurred over, yet without overly punctilious pronunciation. His musicianship and phrasing leave nothing to be desired. His lyric baritone is warm and pleasing to the ear.
Winterreise at Trinity Wall Street Twelfth Night Festival
Meche Kroop, Voce di Meche, January 2016
Photo by Tony Gale

Photo by Tony Gale

As Pelléas, Christopher Dylan Herbert sang with a bright, clear baritone, matching Cardona’s physical abandon.
Pelléas and Mélisande with Floating Opera New York
Andreas Hager, Opera Today, October 2015
The compelling baritone Christopher Dylan Herbert shone as the prince Pelléas...
Pelléas and Mélisande with Floating Opera New York
Meche Kroop, Voce di Meche, October 2015
The vocal music stood out. Herbert sang the Pilgrim’s Song, with string quartet, and Horner-Kwiatek sang Es sang vor langen Jahren and My Heart’s in the Highlands. Both singers projected easily into the hall, and their clear, direct and shining voices were perfect for the music’s aesthetics.
— Arvo Pärt at Eighty concert at The Metropolitan Museum of Art
George Grella, New York Classical Review, September 2015
Rich-voiced baritone Christopher Dylan Herbert as the Pharisee seemed born to sing in Italian.
— Caldara's Maddalena with The American Classical Orchestra
Jon Sobel, Blogcritics, April 2015
Christopher Herbert (the Pharisee) is a fine Baroque singer who brought subtlety and nuance to his role.
— Caldara's Maddalena with The American Classical Orchestra
Jean Ballard Terepka, Theaterscene.net, April 2015
Christopher Dylan Herbert’s king — jealous and touchy from the get-go and starkly raving soon enough — evoked Sergei Eisenstein’s cinematic Ivan the Terrible, Nikolai Cherkassov, in both the affecting-but-almost-over-the-top-suffering and the youthful, vigorous good looks
— Handel's Saul with Trinity Wall Street Twelfth Night Festival
David Shengold, Opera News, March 2015
Christopher Dylan Herbert, a baritone and a doctoral fellow at Juilliard, heard recently as the title character in a splendid staging of Handel’s Saul, gave a sterling performance, which seemed all the more expressive for its intense restraint.
— Somei Satoh's The Last Song with New Juilliard Ensemble's FOCUS! Festival
James R. Oestreich, The New York Times, January 2015
Christopher Dylan Herbert, a baritone as Saul, was also everywhere eloquent and convincing.
— Handel's Saul with Trinity Wall Street Twelfth Night Festival
James R. Oestreich, The New York Times, January 2015
The title role was sung by barihunk Christopher Dylan Herbert, who possesses one of the most eloquent and richly beautiful baritone voices in the business.
— Handel's Saul with Trinity Wall Street Twelfth Night Festival
Barihunks, January 2015
...Christopher Dylan Herbert, an actor of imposing utterance and commanding brow, stalking about the stage in agonized and murderous silence during ritornellos. It was not easy to take your eyes off him, and we were all startled (especially if we knew the Bible or the libretto, in which no such event occurs) when, on Jonathan’s defying his command to murder David, he slowly strangled his son before our eyes then, clutching the body, wept, silently... Herbert’s voice is pleasant and well trained.
— Handel's Saul with Trinity Wall Street Twelfth Night Festival
John Yohalem, Parterre Box, January 2015
Baritone Christopher Herbert provided dramatic singing in both the cantatas and Magnificat, with his interpretation of Herod in Part VI of the Oratorio laden with a bit of sarcasm, and the “Quia Fecit” aria of the Magnificat sufficiently regal.
— J.S. Bach Magnificat and Christmas Oratorio with Princeton Pro Musica, Princeton, NJ
Nancy Plum, Princeton Town Topics, December 2014
Avec cet irrésistible mélange de décontraction et de professionnalisme « made in USA » que l’on retrouve avec joie chez maints artistes américains, Christopher Dylan Herbert s’est adressé à l’auditoire dans un français délicieux, pour introduire les bis de rigueur.

Après avoir assuré que ses camarades et lui-même aimaient « bien beaucoup » chanter en France – c’était à Saint-Père leur deuxième prestation hexagonale –, le baryton à la prestance de star de cinéma a signalé avec humour et naturel la présence d’un stand, sur le parvis de l’église, proposant les CD de New York Polyphony, sans oublier d’annoncer la sortie toute proche de leur nouvel enregistrement, un florilège de chants de Noël…”

”With an irresistible combination of informality and “Made in the USA” professionalism, Christopher Dylan Herbert addressed the audience in delicious French to introduce the encores.

After having assured us that he and his fellow performers greatly enjoyed singing in France (this was their second appearance in France), the baritone, with the natural stage presence of a movie star humorously discussed New York Polyphony’s CDs without forgetting to announce their latest release, an anthology of Christmas carols...
— NEW YORK POLYPHONY concert for Rencontres musicales de Vézelay, France
Emanuelle Giuliani, La Croix, August 2014
Christopher Dylan Herbert climbed well into the higher register of the duet.
ISRAEL IN EGYPT with Princeton Pro Musica, Princeton, NJ
Nancy Plum, Princeton Town Topics, May 2014
Handsome, slender Christopher Herbert is physically all wrong for the ugly giant Polypheme. Fortunately, he’s a terrific actor and an exemplary singer, and his resonant baritone is perfect for ‘O ruddier than the cherry.’ He made the villain funny and scary at the same time, as he should be.
ACIS AND GALATEA with Musica Angelica, Long Beach, California
Jim Ruggirello, Long Beach Gazette, February 2014
Photo by Noah Stern Weber. Used courtesy of PROTOTYPE Festival.

Photo by Noah Stern Weber. Used courtesy of PROTOTYPE Festival.

Christopher Dylan Herbert gave a searing performance in the title role, minutely finessing the vibrato in his bright baritone to suggest Watson’s encroaching panic.
Visitations with New York Polyphony at Prototype Festival/Roulette, Brooklyn, New York
James Jorden, New York Observer, January 2014
In ‘The War Reporter,’ Christopher Herbert (baritone) plays Paul Watson, the real-life Pulitzer Prize-winning photojournalist, who is haunted by the ghost of the dead American soldier whose photo he snaps as it is dragged indifferently through the streets of Mogadishu. Herbert gives a charged performance (most convincing in his dashing tinted Ray-Ban’s) that travels between moods of strict personal severity to those of extreme vulnerability, fishing into a lake of guilt that endlessly drags him down. The audience, I’m sure, held onto every syllable in the distressing aria he offers to his therapist (Hughes) about his own father’s experience as a soldier—both an acknowledgement of Herbert’s talent but also the librettist’s succinctly simple, yet jarring, story-within-a-story verse.
Visitations with New York Polyphony at Prototype Festival/Roulette, Brooklyn, New York
Daniele Sahr, Seen and Heard International, January 2014
Strong performances also came from baritone Christopher Herbert, who offered a full and resonant tone in dual roles as the Christian kings Pendragon and Uterpendragon.
Merlin with Hugo Kauder Society, New Haven, Connecticut
Aaron Keebaugh, Boston Classical Review, June 2013
Baritone Christopher Dylan Herbert owned the role of Watson, singing in beautiful defiance of the capacity of a single human breath. Herbert sang through ends of phrases with seemingly infinite decrescendos, setting the listener adrift in the fog of his character’s mind. When a single instrument continues this thread of sound, it feels... as if time stands still.
Visitations with New York Polyphony at Stanford University, Palo Alto, California
Heather Heise, NewMusicBox, April 2013
The protagonist, Paul, was sung by the vibrant baritone Christopher Dylan Herbert... the psychological drama of Paul’s traumatized conscience locked in a stifling embrace with the ghost of Sergeant Cleveland.
Visitations with New York Polyphony at Stanford University, Palo Alto, California
Corinna da Fonseca-Wollheim, The New York Times, April 2013
Baritone Christopher Dylan Herbert brought nuance to the complex character of Paul. Herbert shone during exchanges with other singers, particularly during Paul’s heart-wrenching phone conversation with Cleveland’s brother (sung marvelously by bass Craig Phillips). Their ears glued to telephone receivers, bereft of eye contact and physical interaction, the two gave a performance that crackled with tension.
Visitations with New York Polyphony at Stanford University, Palo Alto, California
Dana Wen, I Care If You Listen, April 2013
Photo by Noah Stern Weber. Used courtesy of PROTOTYPE Festival.

Photo by Noah Stern Weber. Used courtesy of PROTOTYPE Festival.

New York Polyphony baritone Christopher Dylan Herbert sang with nuance as [Paul] Watson.
Visitations with New York Polyphony at Stanford University, Palo Alto, California
Georgia Rowe, San Jose Mercury News, April 2013
Only lack of snow kept it from being the ideal scene for the baritone Christopher Dylan Herbert’s brave and, in all senses, chilling outdoor performance of Schubert’s “Winterreise”...he gave an elegantly lean performance that would have been impressive in any context but was remarkable under these conditions...The static of the radios, like surface noise from an old LP, added to the melancholy, as did the juxtaposition of their scratchy faintness and Mr. Herbert’s hearty yet poignantly isolated presence. Near the end of the cycle, in front of a still fountain, he flung out the final word of “Der Wegweiser” with a quiet disgust that was startling, given the performance’s intimacy. You have not truly experienced “Winterreise” until you have stood three or four feet from the singer, his breath visible in the cold.
Winterize/Winterreise at The Brooklyn Botanic Garden, Brooklyn, New York
Zachary Woolfe, The New York Times, December 2012
Photo by Joanne Bouknight

Photo by Joanne Bouknight

A remarkably refined account.
Winterize/Winterreise at The Brooklyn Botanic Garden, Brooklyn, New York
Alex Ross, The Rest Is Noise, December 2012
Although singing in the cold, Mr. Herbert proved to have a rich, theatrical baritone that had no difficulty being heard in this outdoor setting. He projected the emotions behind this descent into madness, capturing the irony of the cycle’s more fantastical moments and the self-flagellating character of Schubert’s protagonist. From the steady tramp of “Gute Nacht” through the manic determination of later songs like Mut, this was a consistent, and sometimes harrowing performance. He managed the wide spectrum of sounds, even floating a lovely “head voice” in the more difficult passages of Die Nebensonnen and the haunting despair of Der Leiermann.
Winterize/Winterreise at The Brooklyn Botanic Garden, Brooklyn, New York
Paul J. Pelkonen, Superconductor, December 2012
Christopher Dylan Herbert gave us a lovely set by Korngold and made vocal gold out of Roussel’s “Le Jardin Mouille”, Auric’s “Le Gloxinia”, and Faure’s setting of a Victor Hugo poem “Puisqu’ici-bas toute ame”. Maestro Bagwell himself was the piano partner and played with his customary sensitivity and delicacy, always supporting the singer; indeed they seemed to breathe together.
— Recital for the Lotte Lehmann Foundation, New York, New York
Meche Kroop, The Opera Insider, May 2011
Once again [Christopher Herbert] delivers a performance of incredible depth and beauty of tone.
Winterreise with Le Salon des Musiques, Los Angeles, California
Barihunks, February, 2011
Christopher Dylan Herbert communicated every nuance of nine songs selected from Schubert’s “Die Winterreise”. His youthful and plangent baritone brought out every color—irony, sadness, bitterness, anger, despair and confusion. His German diction was so clear that I understood every word. Translations not necessary! I just want to hear Mr. Herbert sing the entire cycle. I am THERE! I have heard it said that this cycle needs to be performed by someone older and more experienced but I beg to differ. Only a youngster would experience such intense experience from what seems to be the loss of a first love. And Mr. Herbert’s voice has that youthful bloom, especially when he uses his head voice in the beginning pianissimo. As the winter voyage continues, his voice deepens a bit as anger and despair take over. It seemed as if Mr. Herbert were telling his own story; now that’s performing!
Winterreise at the Austrian Cultural Forum, New York, New York
Meche Kroop, The Opera Insider, December 2010
In that role [Henrik], baritone Christopher Dylan Herbert sang exceptionally well, and his repressed, edgy characterization was just right.
— Henrik in A Little Night Music, Opera Theatre of Saint Louis, Saint Louis, Missouri
Judith Malafronte, Opera News, August, 2010
Christopher Dylan Herbert was a splendidly neurotic twit as Henrik Egerman…
— Henrik in A Little Night Music, Opera Theatre of Saint Louis, Saint Louis, Missouri
Scott Cantrell, Dallas Morning News, June 20, 2010
Although dashing Christopher Herbert as the young son Henrik is a baritone, he negotiated the high flying tenorial phrases very winningly, and found a sweet core of heartsickness to temper his outward insufferability.
— Henrik in A Little Night Music, Opera Theatre of Saint Louis, Saint Louis, Missouri
James Sohre, Opera Today, June 21, 2010
Christopher Herbert, as Albert’s buddy Sid, took top marks for clarity of text. The baritone also produced a consistently warm sound, phrased colorfully and used his natural theatrical skills to great advantage.
— Sid in Albert Herring, Opera Vivente, Baltimore, Maryland
Tim Smith, Baltimore Sun, May 4, 2009
…the operatic training was abundantly clear, the poise complete…Christopher Herbert was easy on the ears with a solid, honest sound.
Make Mine Bernstein, Boston Pops, Kimmel Center, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania
Peter Dobrin, Philadelphia Inquirer, August 22, 2008
Samuel Barber’s setting of Mathew Arnold’s ‘Dover Beach,’ was presented with the proper melancholic stateliness by baritone Christopher Herbert, backed by a string quartet.
Dover Beach at Hahn Hall, Music Academy of the West, Santa Barbara, California
Charles Donelan, The Santa Barbara Independent, August 21, 2008
Christopher Herbert’s Pluto came closest to the mark with his smooth baritone and colorful styling.
— Pluto in Orpheus in the Underworld, Opera Vivente, Baltimore, Maryland
Tim Smith, Baltimore Sun, April 14, 2008
Put a star next to the promising voice of Christopher Herbert’s Pluto.
— Pluto in Orpheus in the Underworld, Opera Vivente, Baltimore, Maryland
Charles T. Downey, Ionarts, April 13, 2008
Baritone Christopher Herbert performed heroically with Orff’s cruelly high tessitura and sang with impeccable diction.
Carmina Burana, Collegiate Chorale of New York
Robert Levine, Classics Today, May 15, 2007
Talent-rich Christopher Herbert gives the operetta a crazy buoyancy
The Merry Widow, Mobile Opera, Mobile, Alabama
Thomas Harrison, The Mobile Press-Register, Oct. 26, 2006
The combination of vocal and interpretive skills in the work of several was outstanding. Baritone Christopher Herbert proved versatile, moving from gusto in a comic dialogue to the restrained dignity of ‘Elegy for JFK’.
— All-Stravinsky Concert, Tanglewood Music Center, Lenox, Massachusetts
Richard Dyer, The Boston Globe, August 16, 2005
The Tanglewood fellow Christopher Herbert more than held [his] own vocally and delivered [his] material with a freshness, spontaneity, and charm.
A Celebration of Sondheim, Boston Pops, Koussevitzky Music Shed, Lenox, Massachusetts
Richard Dyer, The Boston Globe, July 22, 2005